Budget-friendly FreeNAS raid-z

When I wrote my previous post, I did not want to too much into detail about my NAS setup.  But, I still had an urge to tell about the splendid configuration.

My motivation for setting up my own freenas server, was my very positive previous experience with the software. And, by having my own configuration, I would be better able to provide both usability and technical troubleshooting.

These sort of posts are usually only of interest of potential buyers googling a specific product – and likewise software product.

But, without further adieu here is:

Yet another hardware configuration blog post

FreeNAS logo

The NAS consists of the following components

  • Jetway NC9C-550-LF motherboard
  • 2GB DDR3 1333 SODIMM I bought along with the motherboard
  • Jetway 4x SATA daughterboard
  • 4x WD20EARS harddisks
  • Lian Li 6070 Scandinavian edition chassis
  • An old usb key (2Gb .. I think)
  • An old pci ethernet adaptor

Lian li has apparently taken the chassis off their site, but Anandtech still has a nice review of the case.

The main reason I used this chassis is because I had it laying around, so to speak. The same goes for the motherboard, as it was a surplus from my previous NAS building experience.

The motivation for building the was the horrible near-datadeath experience I recently  had.So, I thought the time was ripe for a fault-tolerant storage medium.

As I had previously had a positive experience with both FreeNAS and zfs, the choice naturally fell on these. The installation is so very very easy: Download the the embedded gzipped image, put in an empty (or with non-precious content) usb key, and run the following (on a Linux box):

gunzip -c <path>/FreeNAS-amd64-embedded-xxx.img | dd of=/dev/sdx

Replacing the x’s and <path> with the relevant parameters.

Getting the RTL8111E to work

Note: This only applies to FreeNAS 7. The interface is supported in the FreeBSD 8.0 branch, and hereby FreeNAS 8.

The two onboard Realtek interfaces is not supported by the FreeBSD 7.3-RELEASE kernel.  This is also where the old pci network adapter comes in play. I used an older 3com 10/100 card, these are well supported.

However, you can get the onboard NIC’s up and running by downloading and installing the appropriate driver.

You can download the driver here: Realtek RTL8111E FreeBSD 7.3 64-bit driver

Remount /cf as read-write

# mount -o rw /cf

And place the driver in /cf/boot/kernel/

Lastly, you need to update /cf/boot/loader.conf to include the line if_rl_load=”YES” – and your’re done.

Now you can reboot, or remount /cf as read-only and use kldload to load the new driver.

You can follow a related discussion about the driver here.

The filesystem for the disks is zfs, and the raid-z pool is created manually as described in this previous post.

To finish it off: here are some photo’s of the current setup:

The 120mm fan is almost as large as the mainboard
A mini-ITX board looks kind of lonely in an ATX case :-)

Some words about performance

The embedded Atom CPU is definitely not a speed demon in any way. SSH transfer speeds peaks at 5 MB/s but are usually around 3-4 MB/s.
Sequential FTP uploads are about 25 MB/s. CPU usage is about 70% across all “cores”

As far as i can remember, the whole system uses about 50W.

The price of the system is not really represented here – as I have used spare parts, but similar components can be bought for about 450€

All in all a good, stable and robust system.

3 Responses

  1. Hi,

    Thanks for the guide! The link to the driver does not seem to work. Would it be possuble for you to check it?

    Cheers

Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>